Masao Maeda (1904 - 1974)

DSC_0837.JPG
DSC_0846.JPG
DSC_0835.JPG
DSC_0840.JPG
DSC_0842.JPG
DSC_0841.JPG
DSC_0837.JPG
DSC_0846.JPG
DSC_0835.JPG
DSC_0840.JPG
DSC_0842.JPG
DSC_0841.JPG

Masao Maeda (1904 - 1974)

525.00

Masao Maeda (1904 - 1974)
"Stone Pavement in Qubai-in"
Limited Edition Woodblock 7/50
18 x 24 inches
Pencil Signed: Masao Maeda (lower left) w/ chop mark
1962

Add To Cart

"Maeda was born in Hakodate, an island of Hokkaido, and met Hiratsuka Un'ichi who was a leader of the sosaku hanga print movement in 1923.  He moved to Tokyo in 1925 and joined the private Kawabata Painting School, moving on to more thoroughly study Western-style painting with Umehara Ryuzauro, who knew Hiratsuka.  At first he painted in oils, but by associating with Hiratsuka in the so-called Yoyogi Group (print artists who gathered at Hiratsuka's house in the Yoyogi district of Tokyo in the 1930s) and in the Kokuga-kai (National Painting Association) he learned woodblock techniques and began to make and exhibit prints in the 1930s. 

In 1940 he turned exclusively to prints.  He was a member of Onchi Koshiro's, another leader of the sosaku hanga print movement. He contributed to One Hundred New Views of Japan (1940), the two Kitsutsuki Hanga-shu collections (1942-3) and no.s 3-6 of the Ichimokushu collections (1947-50). He was publicized by Oliver Statler in his book Modern Japanese Woodblock Prints: An Art Reborn (1956) (where his date of birth is given as 1906.)  A typical sosaku hanga group artist in many ways, Maeda nevertheless showed untypically the influence of Nihonga native-style painting.  He also produced fine mountain scenes a little in the vein of Umetaro Azechi (1902-1999)."Artist Bio from My Japanesse Hanga"

This unusually large limited edition wood block is a beautiful example of Masao Maeda's favorite medium, woodblock, which he practiced the greater part of his life and is now remembered for. Entitled "Stone Pavement in Quabai-in" this unusually large woodblock is hand singed in pencil in the lower left corner "Masao Maeda" with his chop mark just above it clearly imprinted. Not only this but the print has Japanesse characters written in left margin, dated 1962 and an early print being just number 7 of a limited 50 prints. The total dimension of this woodblock is approximately 18 x 24 inches while the thin black metal frame it rests in is 26 x 32 inches. The condition of the print is very good with minimal foxing and the small exception of a small 1/2 inch tear in the middle of the composition in the stone block and photographed in the last picture. It is only visible under close examination and most certainly not visible while hanging; this would be an easy restoration job but is not necessary as it does not hurts its aesthetic value or integrity.

Like always please feel free to contact us directly at inquire@henningfineart.com below if you have any questions. 

Name *
Name