James D. Smillie (1833 - 1909)

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James D. Smillie (1833 - 1909)

89.99

James D. Smillie (1833 - 1909)
"Up The Hill"
Etching
8 x 6 inches
Signed in plate, lower left: J Smillie
1879

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James David Smillie in an accomplished nineteenth century etcher and painter, James David Smillie studied from the age of nine under his father, James Smillie (1807-1885), a well known engraver. More than any American etcher of his time, James D. Smillie became an expert in etching and engraving techniques and his advice was sought after by many etchers and printers throughout the latter half of the nineteenth century. Many of the fine etchings commissioned by the "American Art Review", for example, were printed under James David Smillie's supervision. In the late 1880's, James David Smillie was commissioned by the Smithsonian Institute to create drypoints, mezzotints, soft ground etchings and aquatints as examples for other artists to follow. 

The large majority of James D. Smillie's original etchings date from 1878 to 1900 and are striking examples of etching processes. In "Up the Hill", for instance, he spread thin layers of ink upon the plate to create areas of strong tonal values. Up the Hill was published by the "American Art Review", in Boston. In total, this publisher commissioned three Smillie etchings during its publishing history.

James David Smillie was a founding member of the influential New York Etching Club and later became its president. He also served as president of the American Water Color Society from 1873 to 1879. He was made an Associate of the National Academy in 1865 and elected a full Academician in 1876.

This was originally bound in a book and has three spots where staples had held it into the binding. The book was American Art Collections written by William Montgomery in 1889 and included is its cover page. This etching in excellent condition, comes unframed and may have slight imperfections around the border on the margins due to not being framed.